Cleaning struts is such a pain!

AIRCRAFT OWNERS MUST…
  • Carry clean rags, without debris to scratch the chrome surface of the piston
  • Carry a bottle of hydraulic fluid prone to leaking, trashing the interior
CHARTER AND AIRLINES MUST…
  • Comply with safety and hazardous waste regulations
  • Prevent damage to the struts which results in downtime and loss revenue
MILITARY MUST…
  • Comply with technical orders, safety regulation, and waste disposal
  • Prevent safety and technical write ups

There are plenty of cleaning agents that will clean dirt and grime off of aircraft components. However, upon review of aircraft manufacturer’s maintenance manual, the most common way to clean the chrome piston is with the same hydraulic fluid used in the strut: MIL-H-5606 or MIL-H-83282. Strutwipe is manufactured with either fluid to ensure compatibility and prevent degrading the wiper seal.

With Strutwipe, you have a self contained non-drip hydraulic wipe package which can be carried on the aircraft, thrown into a locker or toolbox. No leakage, no problem! Strutwipe has no packing group and is not hazardous under the criteria of the Federal OSHA Hazardous Communication Standard 29CFR 1910.1200. Strutwipe is able to be transported in aircraft per 49CFR Part 173.150 and 175.3.

SEE HOW EASY STRUTWIPE IS TO USE!

Directions for Use

A QUICK LESSON WHY KEEPING CLEAN STRUTS IS SO IMPORTANT:

Shock struts are self-contained hydraulic units that support an aircraft while on the ground and protect the structure during landing. They must be inspected and serviced regularly to ensure proper operation.

A shock strut is constructed of two telescoping cylinders. The upper cylinder is fixed to the aircraft the lower cylinder, the piston, is free to slide in and out of the upper cylinder. An orifice located between the two cylinders provides a passage for fluid from the bottom chamber to enter the top cylinder chamber when the strut is compressed. Upon lift off or rebound from compression, the shock strut tends to extend rapidly.

A packing gland is employed to seal the sliding joint. A packing gland wiper ring is installed in the shock strut. It is designed to keep the sliding surface of the piston from carrying dirt, mud, ice, and snow into the packing gland and upper cylinder. Regular cleaning before refueling of the exposed portion of the strut piston helps the wiper do its job and decreases the possibility of damage to the packing gland,which could cause the strut to a leak.

Once the wiper is damaged a costly overhaul is the only repair to prevent failure. The use of Strutwipe before refueling and use of the aircraft will help prevent premature failure of your struts.